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Archive for the ‘eScience’ Category

The 2012 IEEE International Conference on eScience is taking place in Chicago this year, and we’ll be there Wednesday through Friday to report on talks about the latest in computational research. We’ll update the blog throughout the conference (subject to wifi and electrical outlet availability), and will tweet from the talks @Comp_Inst using the hashtag #eScience.

What to Do (and Say) When the Models Aren’t Good Enough (8:30 – 10:00)

The place where most people encounter computational models in their daily life is via the weather forecast. The meteorologist on the morning news or the information in the Weather app is working with numbers generated by computer models that analyze satellite data and predict out the next 24 hours or longer to some degree of probability. As everyone knows, these weather forecasts aren’t always right, despite centuries of science studying weather patterns and coming up with supposedly better ways of predicting whether it’s going to rain tomorrow or not.

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The 2012 IEEE International Conference on eScience is taking place in Chicago this year, and we’ll be there Wednesday through Friday to report on talks about the latest in computational research. We’ll update the blog throughout the conference (subject to wifi and electrical outlet availability), and will tweet from the talks@Comp_Inst using the hashtag #eScience.

How to Get to All That Data (and When Do the Robots Take Over) (1:00 – 3:00)

A lot of information was shared this afternoon at the conference about the voting habits of people living in Melbourne, Australia. Two different, but related projects from Down Under — the Australian Urban Research Infrastructure Network and esocialscience.org — demonstrated their web-based portals for sharing datasets collected about the country, and both chose to map the distribution of voters for the two major parties in Australia, the Labour party and the Liberals (who are actually conservative, we learned). The presentations, by Gerson Galang at the University of Melbourne and Nigel Ward of the University of Queensland, showed both the mountains of data available to researchers with a few clicks in their browser and the very complicated machinery “under the hood” that makes such voluminous information — along with the analysis and visualization tools often needed by those researchers — so easily accessible.

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The 2012 IEEE International Conference on eScience is taking place in Chicago this year, and we’ll be there Wednesday through Friday to report on talks about the latest in computational research. We’ll update the blog throughout the conference (subject to wifi and electrical outlet availability), and will tweet from the talks @Comp_Inst using the hashtag #eSci12.

Paving Future Cities with Open Data (Panel 2:00 – 3:00)

As the Earth’s population increases, the world is urbanizing at an accelerating rate. Currently, half of the people on planet live in cities, but that number is expected to grow to 70 percent in the coming decades. Booming populations in China and India have driven rapid urban development at a rate unprecedented in human history. Simultaneously, existing cities are releasing more data about their infrastructure than ever before, on everything from crime to public transit performance to snow plow geotracking.

So now is the perfect time for computational scientists to get involved with designing and building better cities, and that was the topic of a panel moderated by Computation Institute Senior Fellow Charlie Catlett. With representatives from IBM and Chicago City Hall and a co-founder of EveryBlock, the panel brought together experts who have already started digging into city data to talk about both the potential and the precautions inherent within.

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